Find Your Fight Song

Like most cancer patients, you may be mentally struggling while healing from cancer-related procedures. Perhaps you had emergency surgery, developed an infection, or are dealing with the side effects of treatment. It’s easy to go from a positive mental state to a negative one. To help combat this issue, develop a playlist of songs that you can listen to throughout the day to gain energy, set a positive tone, and embrace a fighting spirit.

Here are some examples:
“Fight Song” by Rachel Platten
“Rise” by Katy Perry
“Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey
“3 AM” by Matchbox 20
“Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)” by Green Day
“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
“Thunder” by Imagine Dragons
“Shake it Out” by Florence and the Machine
“Beautiful” by Christina Aguilera
“Roar” by Katy Perry
“Survivor” by Destiny’s Child
“Tubthumping (I Get Knocked Down)” by ChumbaWumba
“I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty
“Escapade” Janet Jackson
“Fight Like a Girl” by Bombshel

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, contact Chix 4 a Cause to learn more about our Gifts of Love program. Visit chix4acause.org today.

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Find Your Fight Song

Maintain Control After Your Cancer Diagnosis

When you are diagnosed with cancer or undergoing treatment, keeping track of doctor appointments, surgeries, treatments and more can be overwhelming. Dealing with insurance companies and medical bills while handling emotional ups and downs throughout the day can be frustrating. All of these things can contribute to a feeling a lack of control. Thankfully, there are steps you can take to regain a sense of control over your life.

1. Create something. Write a blog or keep a journal. You can make it public or private. Sharing your feelings, concerns, fears, good and bad days, and everything else can help instill a sense of control. Document what you go through so you can go back and reflect on it to see how far you have come. Or, if you prefer music over writing, compose some music and document what was going on when you created it. If you enjoy art, create a painting or sculpture. Create something that reflects what you are experiencing. Or, start a home project that involves your family. You will gain a sense of control over what is happening to you.

2. Start raising funds for a cure. When you are finished with treatment and recovery, get involved with an organization that is searching for a cancer cure. Run in a marathon, volunteer your time, or do something else so that nobody in the future has to experience what you went through. You will regain a sense of control over your life.

3. Do something you never had the time to do. Perhaps you wanted to learn how to knit or speak a foreign language. Maybe you wanted to drive somewhere to see the mountains or watch the sun set over a lake. Perhaps there are books you started but never finished. Find something that interests you and work on it. Discover how many activities you can check off your list.

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, contact Chix 4 a Cause to learn more about our Gifts of Love program. Visit chix4acause.org today.

Maintain Control After Your Cancer Diagnosis

Learn to Feel Less Isolated After a Cancer Diagnosis

After you receive a cancer diagnosis, the world may seem to be shrinking. What used to be simple may appear incredibly difficult. Countless doctor visits, scans, blood work, fatigue, fear, anger and grief can make you feel isolated, especially if you have metastatic cancer. However, you have to find a sense of belonging and a way to move forward. Here are five suggestions for feeling less isolated after a cancer diagnosis:

1. Get out of bed. Even if you are too tired from treatment to do more than two things during the day, make getting out of bed one of them. Stay with a routine as much as you can. You may decide to take a shower, sit outside, take a walk, or do something else to feel better.

2. Keep a journal. Write down your experiences, observations, and feelings in a journal. Make note of what you see, whether good or bad. Acknowledge the way you feel. Try to make some type of sense of what you are going through.

3. Tell yourself what you want. Talk out loud about what you desire. It may be enough to help you act on it. Remind yourself that you do not have to feel alone. There are family, friends, support groups, and others you can reach out to. Although they may not know what you are experiencing, they can help you feel less isolated.

4. Participate in a support group. There are a multitude of organizations ready to help cancer patients however they can. See whether your hospital or clinic has a patient advocate or navigator with information on finding the best groups for you. Also, look online for immediate resources such as articles, videos, or methods to get in touch with a fellow patient or phone support group.

5. Volunteer. If you have enough energy, volunteer with a nonprofit organization that helped you form connections with other cancer patients. Giving your time and energy will increase your connections and create a larger network to provide support when you need it.

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, contact Chix 4 a Cause to learn more about our Gifts of Love program. Visit chix4acause.org today.

Learn to Feel Less Isolated After a Cancer Diagnosis

Daily Habits to Help Cancer Patients Sleep Better

As a cancer patient, you might have trouble sleeping. Common causes include chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which can disrupt the chemical balance in your body, or changes in hormone levels due to gynecologic surgery, chemotherapy or hormone therapy. Other common causes include side effects of cancer treatment. For instance, medications to control nausea, prednisone, dexamethasone or other corticosteroids may cause wakefulness. Also, opioids and other pain medications may result in excessive sleepiness. Additionally, napping and prolonged sleeping during the day due to fatigue or pain medications may disrupt your wake-sleep cycle, causing difficulty falling asleep at night. If you are in the hospital, pain, noise, and treatment schedules may awaken you at odd times. This is especially true if you are older and in an intensive care setting. Plus, if you had an operation for gynecologic cancer, you may be unable to sleep due to hot flashes or night sweats.

Making simple changes in your daily habits may help you sleep better. For instance, set a routine for sleeping and waking. Limit your nap time to 20 or 30 minutes in the morning or early afternoon. Exercise every morning or afternoon. Avoid eating large meals and spicy or sugary foods four to six hours before bedtime. Limit your caffeine and alcohol intake to the morning or early afternoon. Try drinking warm milk or herbal tea instead.

Talk with your doctor if you have trouble sleeping on multiple occasions. Your body needs proper rest to tolerate treatment and heal. Your doctor may be able to modify your medications if drug interactions or side effects are contributing to your sleep problems.  They may even recommend a medication to help you sleep. Always consult your doctor before taking over-the-counter sleep aids because they may interact with other medications.

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, reach out to Chix 4 a Cause. Learn more about our Gifts of Love program at chix4acause.org today.

Daily Habits to Help Cancer Patients Sleep Better

Supermoto Is August 25, 2018

Who: You, your family & friends, and Chix 4 a Cause
What: Supermoto motorcycle races
Where: Washington County Fair Park, 3000 Pleasant Valley Road, West Bend, WI
When: August 25, 2018 @ noon
Why: Proceeds benefit Chix 4 a Cause

Support Chix 4 a Cause by watching the Supermoto motorcycle charity races at the Washington County Fair Park on August 25, 2018 from noon to 3 pm! The whole family will enjoy Hooligan and Supermoto races. Entry is only $5 per person. We look forward to seeing you!

Supermoto Is August 25, 2018

Thanks to the Shopko Foundation for Our $250 Grant!

Chix 4 a Cause is honored to receive a $250 grant from the Shopko Foundation. Funding will benefit cancer patients in southeastern Wisconsin through our Gifts of Love program.

Gifts of Love are unique to each cancer patient’s needs and help improve their emotional well-being. Typical Gifts include mortgage or rent assistance, gas or grocery cards, a family weekend away, theater or concert tickets, or taxi or bus passes. Gifts of Love can go a long way toward improving a patient’s quality of life at a time when help is needed not only due to mounting medical bills, but also as they struggle with the realities of a cancer diagnosis.

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, reach out to Chix 4 a Cause. Apply for Gifts of Love at chix4acause.org today.

Thanks to the Shopko Foundation for Our $250 Grant!

Daily Habits to Help Cancer Patients Sleep Better

As a cancer patient, you might have trouble sleeping. Common causes include chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which can disrupt the chemical balance in your body, or changes in hormone levels due to gynecologic surgery, chemotherapy or hormone therapy. Other common causes include side effects of cancer treatment. For instance, medications to control nausea, prednisone, dexamethasone or other corticosteroids may cause wakefulness. Also, opioids and other pain medications may result in excessive sleepiness. Additionally, napping and prolonged sleeping during the day due to fatigue or pain medications may disrupt your wake-sleep cycle, causing difficulty falling asleep at night. If you are in the hospital, pain, noise, and treatment schedules may awaken you at odd times. This is especially true if you are older and in an intensive care setting. Plus, if you had an operation for gynecologic cancer, you may be unable to sleep due to hot flashes or night sweats.

Making simple changes in your daily habits may help you sleep better. For instance, set a routine for sleeping and waking. Limit your nap time to 20 or 30 minutes in the morning or early afternoon. Exercise every morning or afternoon. Avoid eating large meals and spicy or sugary foods four to six hours before bedtime. Limit your caffeine and alcohol intake to the morning or early afternoon. Try drinking warm milk or herbal tea instead.

Talk with your doctor if you have trouble sleeping on multiple occasions. Your body needs proper rest to tolerate treatment and heal. Your doctor may be able to modify your medications if drug interactions or side effects are contributing to your sleep problems. They may even recommend a medication to help you sleep. Always consult your doctor before taking over-the-counter sleep aids because they may interact with other medications.

If you or someone you know is battling cancer, reach out to Chix 4 a Cause, Ltd. Learn more about our Gifts of Love program at chix4acause.org today.

Daily Habits to Help Cancer Patients Sleep Better